Range Bank Clean Energy Fund

Range Bank Clean Energy Fund

Range Bank Clean Energy Fund

Grants from the Range Bank Clean Energy Fund support energy transition programs and initiatives in Marquette County including, but not limited to, greater reliance on renewable energy sources, such as wind and solar, reductions in energy demand through a variety of energy efficiency improvements.

Applicants must be qualified nonprofit organizations serving Marquette County. No grants are made to individuals, private foundations, or for-profit enterprises. The maximum grant amount is $5,000.

Projects can include physical improvements (e.g. LED lighting/exit Signs, occupancy sensors, insulation, solar, battery storage, level II EV charging ) and/or non-physical activities (e.g. community engagement, education). 

2021 APPLICATIONS ARE CURRENTLY CLOSED. Please join our email list or check back in 2022. 

History of the Clean Energy Initiative

Michigan is in the midst of a major energy transition, which includes greater reliance on renewable energy sources, such as wind and solar, and reductions in energy demand through a variety of energy efficiency improvements. This “clean energy” transition presents opportunities and challenges that are felt acutely at the community level. Community foundations are well-positioned to help successfully address such challenges and opportunities.

With a 2018 grant from Mott Foundation, the Community Foundation of Marquette County created energy information materials, developed three demonstration sites that illustrate energy efficiency and renewable energy practices, and convened an energy awareness community event.

These outreach efforts served to educate the community on the benefits of clean energy, share environmental and economic benefits documented from project demonstration sites. Key partners of the Initiative included the Superior Watershed Partnership, Michigan Energy Options and Range Bank.

Jumpstart a Heart: AEDs for Marquette County Law Enforcement

Jumpstart a Heart: AEDs for Marquette County Law Enforcement

In 2020, Marquette County Law Enforcement responded to 46 cardiac emergency calls requesting the use of life saving Automated External Defibrillators (AEDs). Law Enforcement Officers are frequently the first to arrive on scene for medical calls because they are already mobile at the time of the call and have the necessary equipment, including AEDs, with them while on patrol.

Jumpstart a Heart is a joint effort by Marquette County Law Enforcement Administrators Association (MCLEAA) and the Community Foundation of Marquette County. The goal is to raise $81,454.50 to purchase new AED equipment for Forsyth Township Police, Negaunee City Police, Michigan State Police, Chocolay Township Police, Marquette City Police, Marquette County Sheriff’s Department, and the Upper Peninsula Substance Enforcement Team. Some of the current equipment is over 15 years old, which means it has passed life expectancy, is no longer reliable, and not compatible with equipment used by EMS teams. Having updated equipment and training will allow for a smooth connection and switch over from the AED unit to advanced lifesaving equipment on scene. Every officer utilizing the AED will have training to operate the equipment along with corresponding CPR and First Aid skills.

Give Now:
Give online, visit Jumpstart a Heart Donation Page

Send a check to:
Community Foundation of Marquette County
PO Box 37
Marquette, MI 49855

Marquette County Sheiff’s Deputy Jennifer Best says, “The hope is that the AEDs are never needed. However, a life changing cardiac event can happen unexpectedly to anyone from an infant to elder, at any time, and any location. These updated AED units can serve patients of any age and are portable enough to be transported to even the most remote area through difficult terrain. Residents, visitors, and those passing through the area can all be tended to by a trained responding officer with this life saving equipment.”

A fundraising campaign is now underway, and MCLEAA is asking for donations from the community to help purchase the equipment to have on patrol by the end of September. MCLEAA partnered with the Community Foundation of Marquette County as the fiscal agent for this project, which means all donations to the project are tax deductible.  The West End Health Foundation, Negaunee Area Community Fund and Marquette Area Community Fund have committed funds to the project.

“The Community Foundation is pleased to partner with MCLEAA on this project,” says Community Foundation CEO Zosia Eppensteiner.  “The need for this equipment was brought to our attention by Sheriff Zyburt. Part of the Community Foundation’s mission is to ‘lead and collaborate to address community opportunities’. Partnering with MCLEAA to raise funds for a project that will address this critical need and create long-term impact for the entire County is definitely something we are excited to be a part of.”

 

Four Rain Gardens Installed in Marquette, Benefiting Residents and Businesses, Creating Educational Opportunities

Four Rain Gardens Installed in Marquette, Benefiting Residents and Businesses, Creating Educational Opportunities

As part of the Great Lakes One Water (GLOW) partnership, and in collaboration with the Superior Watershed Partnership, the Community Foundation of Marquette County is proud to announce the completion of four rain gardens in the City of Marquette.

The Great Lakes One Water partnership is a multi-year, basin-wide initiative focused on engaging shoreline community foundations as a force to advance a new era of water management to benefit people and businesses in the Great Lakes Basin. Led by the Council of Michigan Foundations, the Community Foundation of Marquette County served as the hub for the Lake Superior/Upper Peninsula region. Each partner in the region, with local collaborators, developed a project to advance water infrastructure to improve health, economic development and equity in their communities.

This spring, the Community Foundation of Marquette County, with major logistical support from the Superior Watershed Partnership (SWP), announced the Rain Garden Challenge, an open call for applications to install rain gardens in the City of Marquette. Rain gardens are a sustainable and cost-effective way to absorb stormwater, avert flooding, and prevent harmful pollutants—such as lawn fertilizers and pesticides, automotive fluids, and dirt and debris—from entering the Great Lakes. A panel of experts reviewed the applications to select four sites based on location, including elevation, relation to stormwater runoff and potential for public education.

Despite minor delays due to COVID-19, the SWP’s Great Lakes Conservation Corp installed four rain gardens this summer: two located at residences, one at a the McDonald & Wolf Law Office adjacent to the bike path in Lower Harbor Park, and an educational rain garden at Bothwell Middle School. Funding for the purchase and installation of materials was made possible by the GLOW project.

Gail Anthony, CEO of the Community Foundation of Marquette County said, “We are honored to work with the Superior Watershed Partnership on another successful project. The goal of the project was to show how individuals, businesses and organizations can do their part to protect the lake that we all love. With a small investment and some elbow grease, anyone can have a beautiful natural habitat in their own yard that also helps preserve our fresh water. Pedestrians and bicyclists will have the opportunity to read the educational signage and students at Bothwell Middle School will enjoy an outdoor classroom for years to come. This will all add up to a greater understanding and appreciation of the interconnected water systems we all depend on.”

SWP Executive Director Carl Lindquist agreed, “Community projects like this show the power of local organizations working together to protect Lake Superior. It’s important to point out that this is more than gardening; these projects are a classic example of “green infrastructure.” You could also look at them as a series of small Great Lakes protection projects. The SWP staff looks forward to many more collaborative community projects like this!”

Community Environmental Monitoring Program

Community Environmental Monitoring Program

Community Environmental Monitoring Program

CEMP is an independent program established by the Community Foundation of Marquette County and the Eagle Mine to conduct environmental monitoring related to mining operations at the Eagle Mine in north Marquette County by working with universities, contractors and EPA approved laboratories.

When a mining company comes to town, it’s almost always bound to be controversial. But, in a unique partnership that’s been recognized as a standard for excellence worldwide, Eagle Mine, Community Foundation of Marquette County, and Superior Watershed Partnership are working together to ensure prosperous, healthy, and sustainable outcomes for the people and in Marquette County.

Great Lakes One Water

Great Lakes One Water

Great Lakes One Water

The Community Foundation of Marquette County has joined four other community foundations in the Lake Superior/Upper Peninsula region to release an action plan designed to protect the water resources of the region by limiting the impact of extreme weather events and flooding. The Resilient Future Project seeks to build a community of civic and municipal leaders with the vision and drive to identify and implement strategies to better prepare for severe storm events.

 

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Rain Garden Challenge

As part of GLOW, the Community Foundation of Marquette County has partnered with Superior Watershed Partnership to build rain gardens to three residentials homes and two businesses in the City of Marquette. To apply and for more information of the projects, click on the button.

 

APPLICATION